chead asked: "hey what's up with the "!" in fandoms? i.e. "fat!<thing>" just curious thaxxx <3"

nentuaby:

hosekisama:

michaelblume:

molly-ren:

stevita:

molly-ren:

molly-ren:

I have asked this myself in the past and never gotten an answer.

Maybe today will be the day we are both finally enlightened.

woodsgotweird said: man i just jumped on the bandwagon because i am a sheep. i have no idea where it came from and i ask myself this question all the time

Maybe someone made a typo and it just got out of hand?

I kinda feel like panic!at the disco started the whole exclamation point thing and then it caught on around the internet, but maybe they got it from somewhere else, IDK.

The world may never know…

Maybe it’s something mathematical?

I’ve been in fandom since *about* when Panic! formed and the adjective!character thing was already going strong, pretty sure it predates them.

It’s a way of referring to particular variations of (usually) a character — dark!Will, junkie!Sherlock, et cetera. I have suspected for a while that it originated from some archive system that didn’t accommodate spaces in its tags, so to make common interpretations/versions of the characters searchable, people started jamming the words together with an infix.

(Lately I’ve seen people use the ! notation when the suffix isn’t the full name, but is actually the second part of a common fandom portmanteau. This bothers me a lot but it happens, so it’s worth being aware of.)

"Bang paths" (! is called a "bang"when not used for emphasis) were the first addressing scheme for email, before modern automatic routing was set up. If you wanted to write a mail to the Steve here in Engineering, you just wrote "Steve" in the to: field and the computer sent it to the local account named Steve. But if it was Steve over in the physics department you wrote it to phys!Steve; the computer sent it to the "phys" computer, which sent it in turn to the Steve account. To get Steve in the Art department over at NYU, you wrote NYU!art!Steve- your computer sends it to the NYU gateway computer sends it to the "art" computer sends it to the Steve account. Etc. ("Bang"s were just chosen because they were on the keyboard, not too visually noisy, and not used for a huge lot already).

It became pretty standard jargon, as I understand, to disambiguate when writing to other humans. First phys!Steve vs the Steve right next to you, just like you were taking to the machine, then getting looser (as jargon does) to reference, say, bearded!Steve vs bald!Steve.

So I’m guessing alternate character version tags probably came from that.


marathemara:

iizanimeaddict:

My dad just came into my room and shouted at me in Klingon.

Am I more embarrassed that he did that or that I know he said I was a disappointment to the empire?

You should be most embarrassed that you’re a disappointment to the empire.


"Fan fiction is a way of the culture repairing the damage done in a system where contemporary myths are owned by corporations instead of by the folk."
— Henry Jenkins (Director of media studies at MIT)

rainnecassidy:

johnnysjetpack:

tchy:

dark-vowelled:

sclez:

durendals:

there is literally no difference between academic scholars discussing their interpretations of a text and a bunch of people yelling YOUR HEADCANON IS WRONG at each other

As a Masters student I can vouch for this.

The difference is citations.

image

As a PhD candidate I can guarantee this is 100% accurate

I’m starting grad school in the fall and I’m going to be studying fandom, so basically I’m going to be CITING PEOPLE YELLING ABOUT HEADCANONS, so. BAM.


factsinallcaps:

THE TERM “JUMP THE SHARK” DESCRIBES THE POINT IN A TELEVISION SHOW WHERE IT STOPS CREATIVELY DEVELOPING AND STARTS TO BECOME A SELF-REFERENTIAL CARICATURE OF ITSELF. THIS IS OFTEN ASSOCIATED WITH A SHARP DECLINE IN QUALITY. 

THE PHRASE ITSELF REFERS TO AN EPISODE OF “HAPPY DAYS” SET AT THE BEACH IN WHICH ARTHUR HERBERT “FONZIE” FONZARELLI JUMPS OVER A SHARK WHILE WATERSKIING. THE WRITER OF THAT EPISODE HATES THIS PHRASE, POINTING TO THE POSITIVE RECEPTION OF THE EPISODE AND THE FACT THAT HAPPY DAYS CONTINUED FOR MANY SEASONS AFTERWARDS. HENRY WINKLER, THE ACTOR WHO PLAYED FONZIE, LOVES IT BECAUSE WHENEVER IT’S MENTIONED IN AN ARTICLE, THEY USE THE SAME STILL FRAME OF THAT EPISODE WHERE HE IS IN A SWIMSUIT AND HE LIKES THE WAY HIS LEGS LOOK IN THAT PHOTOGRAPH. 

THE OPPOSITE OF JUMPING THE SHARK IS “GROWING THE BEARD,” OR A POINT WHERE A SHOW’S QUALITY DRAMATICALLY INCREASES, AND IF IT’S A SPIN-OFF, ESPECIALLY WHEN IT STARTS FEELING LIKE ITS OWN SHOW AND NOT SIMPLY AN EXTENSION OF THE PARENT SHOW. 

THIS TERM IS NAMED AFTER STAR TREK: THE NEXT GENERATION, IN WHICH THE MOMENT THE SHOW WAS GENERALLY CONSIDERED TO HAVE COME INTO ITS OWN ROUGHLY CORRESPONDED TO THE BREAK BETWEEN THE FIRST AND SECOND SEASONS, DURING WHICH TIME ACTOR JONATHAN FRAKES WOULD GROW HIS CHARACTER’S NOW-ICONIC BEARD. 

ANOTHER DERIVATIVE IS A TERM FOR WHEN A GOOD FILM’S SEQUELS HAVE BECOME SO RIDICULOUS THAT PEOPLE GENERALLY ACCEPT THAT IT’S TIME TO ALLOW THE FRANCHISE TO DIE. THIS TERM IS “NUKING THE FRIDGE” AND REFERS TO A PART OF INDIANA JONES AND THE KINGDOM OF THE CRYSTAL SKULL WHERE INDIANA JONES SURVIVES AN ATOMIC BOMB BY HIDING IN A LEAD-LINED REFRIGERATOR. 


Tech Writer Clive Thompson: “The world of fanfiction is the most technologically explosive thing I’ve ever seen in my life.”

almostperfectalibi:

The leading flank in discovering how to use technology in cool, interesting, thoughtful ways will generally always be the amateurs. […]

I have a whole theory, actually, that the world of fan fiction is the most technologically explosive thing I’ve ever seen in my life. Every single technology that has come along, fan fiction people have come along and colonized it and stress-tested it and found the most amazing things. They were the first people to realize the potential of meta-tagging and bookmarking sites. Like, here’s a link with four tags, and then you go to a fan fiction person, and they have a link, and it has 70 tags. They are pushing this to absolute limit, and they are finding these amazing ways to sort knowledge.

It’s all because they’re passionate and nobody is making any money off of it and they don’t want to make any money off of it. They get some amazing stuff done. If you’re ever wondering about a future technology, just drop what you’re doing and find out what fan fiction people are doing with it. What are fan fiction people doing right now with WhatsApp? I don’t know. But, whatever it is, it’s the future. 

- SXSW Interview: Author Clive Thompson Explains FOMO, the NSA, and His Latest Book, “Smarter Than You Think” (x)

wow!


Fandom and Ew, Girls

urbanhymnal:

I’ve talked about before how I feel about the idea that there is anything called a normal fan, but today I want to talk a little bit about fandom because it is often held up as being gross in some fashion and I think, at its base, there is one simple phrase that this disgust is built upon. At some point in a criticism of fandom there will be a phrase like this one, either explicitly stated or heavily implied:

'Fandom's full of straight, white girls.' 

The first part of the sentence is fine. Fandom is full. Fandom is full of passion. Of art. Of writing. Of discussion. Most importantly, fandom is full of people all bursting to be heard.

What about the second part of that sentence? Well, that’s where things get messy. The phrase conjures up images of women screaming and fainting at the mere mention of The Beatles, NKotB, or Justin Bieber. In these cases, every use of the word ‘fan’ in media really does mean ‘fanatic,’ because there is something fanatical in the way these images are presented. Normal people, of course, would never cry over music. Would never stomp their feet and shake their heads in excitement. Would never gasp or cheer when they saw someone they greatly admired. Would never faint when moved by something. It’s inappropriate, right? “Fervor, shrieking, bizarre,” the journalist says with a grin, and we are all supposed to laugh at the joke. 

Read More


sun-to-sirius:

sergeantjerkbarnes:

simplydalektable:

hannahrhen:

sergeantjerkbarnes:

so i just googled the phrase “toeing out of his shoes” to make sure it was an actual thing

and the results were:

image

it’s all fanfiction

which reminds me that i’ve only ever seen the phrase “carding fingers through his hair” and people describing things like “he’s tall, all lean muscle and long fingers,” like that formula of “they’re ____, all ___ and ____” or whatever in fic

idk i just find it interesting that there are certain phrases that just sort of evolve in fandom and become prevalent in fic bc everyone reads each other’s works and then writes their own and certain phrases stick

i wish i knew more about linguistics so i could actually talk about it in an intelligent manner, but yeah i thought that was kinda cool

Ha! Love it!

One of my fave authors from ages ago used the phrase “a little helplessly” (like “he reached his arms out, a little helplessly”) in EVERY fic she wrote. She never pointed it out—there just came a point where I noticed it like an Easter egg. So I literally *just* wrote it into my in-progress fic this weekend as an homage only I would notice. <3

To me it’s still the quintessential “two dudes doing each other” phrase.

I think different fic communities develop different phrases too! You can (usually) date a mid 00s lj fic (or someone who came of age in that style) by the way questions are posed and answered in the narration, e.g. “And Patrick? Is not okay with this.” and by the way sex scenes are peppered with “and, yeah.” I remember one Frerard fic that did this so much that it became grating, but overall I loved the lj style because it sounded so much like how real people talk.

Another classic phrase: wondering how far down the _ goes. I’ve seen it mostly with freckles, but also with scars, tattoos, and on one memorable occasion, body glitter at a club. Often paired with the realization during sexy times that “yeah, the __ went all they way down.” I’ve seen this SO much in fic and never anywhere else

whoa, i remember reading lj fics with all of those phrases! i also remember a similar thing in teen wolf fics in particular - they often say “and derek was covered in dirt, which. fantastic.” like using “which” as a sentence-ender or at least like sprinkling it throughout the story in ways published books just don’t.

LINGUISTICS!!!! COMMUNITIES CREATING PHRASES AND SLANG AND SHAPING LANGUAGE IN NEW WAYS!!!!!!!

ULTIMATE linguistics boner oh man this reminds me of my studies.

I would still love to see people study this as a subculture for its language development, SEPCIFICALLY WRITTEN LANGUAGE since few fics are ONLY podfic, thus we have turns of phrase and certain pacing that fits in writing and would not quite read the same.

It’s so fascinating. If I ever return to study my major this is my goal for a thesis

I have definitely noticed “carding his/her fingers through his/her hair,” emerging in the last, like, year or so. It seems to be particularly popular in Arrow fandom? At least amongst the fandoms that I do a lot of fic reading for. It’s become so prevalent that I have actually found myself wondering where it came from/how it got like that on several occasions. Not because it bothers me or anything, but because I don’t really see it outside of fanfic but all of the sudden it’s all over a bunch of my fandoms, so. Yeah, I am curious.

And the question/answer + “which. adjective." things, YES. LJ fic heyday like whoa. On the rare occasions that I try to write snarky POV fic, I still catch myself doing that, because I came up in the LJ days.

I’d say I would try to send my thesis/dissertation explorations in this direction but it’s probably a bit too linguistics-heavy, whereas I’m getting a media studies degree. BUT STILL. “Something about fanfic” is still one of my current top choices for a thesis topic, lol. So, you know. WE SHALL SEE WHAT HAPPENS.

(tagging jnikkir because this is relevant to her interests)